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Stormy Mondays by Skip Fox Now Available!

 Skip Fox’s Stormy Mondays reveals a pensiveness borne of long and deep experience. Fortunately, what also is revealed is infinite desire for. For love. For life. For humor. For awe. For blasphemy. For wit (never forget wit). For your existence, Reader. And Skip Fox gets your attention with poems that do many things including enchant—“enters through pores of music. Moment complete. Universals goosing each particular”—as well as memoir-prose that recalls things you, too, want to remember—“What was it like to have found it (poetry, open and fresh, incarnation pointing forward and back) as it came over the first years of the world’s horizon, when you could still search out Kerouac, say, and give him a blow-job if he wanted (purely out of respect).” There are gems here: it’s Skip Fox’s Monday. Push through and get into the smoke. Whatever happened before Monday, Monday also means a beginning. Read to feel the future lives offered by these fascinating word-doors.

—Eileen R. Tabios, author of AMNESIA: Somebody’s Memoir


A strikingly original voice in New American poetry—intelligent and wide-ranging: a questioner, a rememberer and a myth-weilder on a par with Olson, Dorn, Duncan,—in short, a discovery waiting to happen. Now is your chance to make it happen for you.

—Jesse Glass, author of The Passion of Phineas Gage and Selected Poems and Lost Poet, Four Plays.


Skip Fox learned to cook in a cast-iron pot over a camp fire. The proteins and carbohydrates are always profoundly local, liberated (he eschews barter) from the gardens and game preserves of the landed. The seasonings, on the other hand, are gleaned from any field available to a poet of his resources: a little self-deprecating swagger from Arkilokos, a full measure of Juvenal’s indignation; each taste a sufficiency of Catullus, Bertrand, Cavalcanti, Villon, Lyly, Jonson, Dryden, Blake, Mallarmé, Whitman, Pound, Tzara, Benn, Crane, Patchen, Dorn, Mayer, Mackey; often so well-blended as to make recognition of the individual ingredients irrelevant, but sometimes tasting pointedly of a particular donor. Salted with contempt, sweetened with understanding. Diners push away from the table feeling full but knowing plenty remains. There is no poet less exclusive nor any more essential. If you want to know what stew can be at its best, read this book. Taste of it; you’ll be back for another helping soon.

—Brian Richards, author of Enridged and Occasional Cleavage.



Young Poets! Lend an ear. “We cover the creature with glare, mute as mangled body parts, fender and grill (skirts with chrome panties).” Stormy Mondays is first class language assault. Skip Fox takes all-the-right-moves a step further. Burning up the page with true funk of a madcap joy in language born of working class intellectualism. An everyday neo-tautology of smooth ass millennial occult poetics spun out by one wisecracking emcee. “I wouldn’t’ve believed my own ears if it wasn’t for the words my mouth had been saying...” Poet-professors, cover your ears and pray for your students! It won’t be the same AWP this year.

—Patrick Dunagan, author of Drops of Rain / Drops of Wine.


Skip Fox is back, this time with Stormy Mondays, the fifth book in his epic Dream of a Book series. If it’s true (and it is) that we write one poem our whole life, then Skip’s found the trap door that includes everything. Bumper stickers, mini-novels, fortune cookies, and “Sure Shots” embroider themselves to create books within books as the poems “Passages” and “Structure of Rhyme” do in Robert Duncan’s oeuvre. Time to stick out your thumb, jump in the car, and sharpen your wit. You’ll get to know Skip quickly, he’s the same off the page as he is on–a hybrid universe of multiple voices communicating in whatever form they challenge to arrive in.

—Micah Ballard, author of AFTERLIVES.


There isn’t a wilder animal in the forest of language than Skip Fox. Not feral (never tamed), profligate though rarely seen, expert at camouflage in the thickets of poetry or prose or politics or philosophy or most any habitat normal humans find discomfiting, cunning vulpine capable of moving in utter silence, erasing its spoor as it goes, or noisy feints that send its terrified prey straight into its jaws, Fox skipped over the more tedious steps in the evolutionary chain and has lodged itself as a primal key in the ecology of the universe. Having learned a lesson or two from the drunken pomp of English equestrian semantics, Fox thrives in any climate or terrain, any phylum or category, any metaphor or mixed-up geography. You may not confront Fox head-on, but you’ll feel the chill of that quick glimpse from the corner of your eye.

—Bill Lavender, author of Memory Wing

Skip Fox dedicated his life to poetry while working in the woods on Washington’s Olympic Peninsula in the summer of 1969. He graduated from Bowling Green State University in 1981 and has since taught at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. He lives by himself on a few acres in the country in a log cabin with a pond out back. Literature, art, music, film, drama, students, three children, and four grandchildren grace his existence.


Book Information:

· Paperback: 170 pages

· Binding: Perfect-Bound

· Publisher: BlazeVOX [books] 

· ISBN: 978-1-60964-261-7

$16

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Stormy Mondays by Skip Fox Book Preview

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Museum Hours by Michael Kelleher Now Available!

Museum Hours, Michael Kelleher’s first published collection of poems since 2007, is comprised of four sections imagined as rooms in a museum with “bright white walls./Infinitely tall.” The museum is a kind of memory palace, where images impress themselves on the mind with indelible force. The reader of Museum Hours is asked not so much to read these poems as to “inhabit and wander through” them, “Endlessly. Endlessly.”

“The poems in Michael Kelleher’s new book, Museum Hours, are by turns clever, moving, haunting, artful, and always well constructed. Whether it is a witty list-poem ‘Nature Mort’, or a prose-poem ‘Weather Report’, or the wonderful seventeen-part heliotropic long-poem set up as tightly wrought quintets — the poetry always soars. To savour them, one must return to them again and again, gently soaking in the art.”

—Sudeep Sen, author of EroText (Penguin Random House) & the editor of The HarperCollins Book of English Poetry

“Attraction has its pulls,” writes Michael Kelleher. Museum Hours maps, in moving ways, the force of gravity that art has on our lives, our attentions. One trusts the secrets that Kelleher’s poems share. With their precision, their quietness, their frequently keen but subtle wit, these poems enter the ear and the mind as intimately as a sudden sense of wonder just before “the roof gives way to the stars.”

—Richard Deming, Yale University

Michael Kelleher is the director of the Windham-Campbell Literature Prizes at Yale University. He formerly served as Artistic and Associate Director of Just Buffalo Literary Center in Buffalo, New York, where he founded Babel, an international lecture series in which he interviewed authors such as V. S. Naipaul, Salman Rushdie and Zadie Smith.

His published collections of poetry include Museum Hours (BlazeVOX, 2016), Human Scale (BlazeVOX, 2007), and To Be Sung (BlazeVOX, 2004). His poems and essays have appeared in The Brooklyn Rail, Colorado Review, the Poetry Foundation Website, Sentence: A Journal of Prose Poetics, ecopoetics, The Poetry Project Newsletter, The Queen St. Quarterly, Slope, and others.

From 2008-13 he produced a blog project entitled “Aimless Reading,” in which he documented the more than 1,200 books in his personal library.


Book Information:

· Paperback: 102 pages

· Binding: Perfect-Bound

· Publisher: BlazeVOX [books] 

· ISBN: 978-1-60964-243-3

$16

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Museum Hours by Michael Kelleher Book Preview

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GHOST / LANDSCAPE by by Kristina Marie Darling & John Gallaher is featured at Verse Daily

GHOST / LANDSCAPE by by Kristina Marie Darling & John Gallaher is featured at Verse Daily! Hurray and congrats!


®

Today's poem is by Kristina Marie Darling & John Gallaher

The Museum of the Occupation 
        

So, of course, you have to go in. And of course, each piece has
a card that reads "Give Me Back" beneath it, but, as you're
reading it, it's not clear if it's directed at you or if it's just a
subtle reminder that each brick of the city was forged in a
different world, by different workers, with their different
dreams and hopes who were later to be shot and lined in rows
to illustrate the garden plot, where the hedge will one day go.
It's April. There's a woodpecker letting loose somewhere
down the block. The museum windows are open, which
makes it seem the woodpecker is right next to you. But
instead, you've just this floorplan with the guard rotation
schedule and a cyanide pill in case you're captured, and the
questions get too complicated, where you forget to carry the
ten, and they implore you to take a light rest, maybe some
lemonade. "I Remember" is the title of the travelling
exhibition you came expressly to see, and it's still here, which
is surprising, as usually by the time you get to these things
they've gone on to Cincinnati. It's never really Cincinnati,
though. When we say Cincinnati we just mean we're going to
die soon, that the weather's looking bad.

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Kristina Marie Darling and John Gallaher: The TNB Self-Interview

 

kmd-jg

 

What are three things you want the reader to know about GHOST / LANDSCAPE?

KMD: In the poems, you’ll find a bank robbery, a lock on the door, and a freezer we keep forgetting we keep in the basement. One (and only one) of these things is real.

Now that you’ve entered the landscape, don’t follow the paths that seem most clearly marked. They’ll lead you further away from the guesthouse (and the truth about the ghost).

Lastly, and most importantly, the conference we keep referring to was really an elaborate cover-up. Even the panels were just for show.

JG: Things keep changing, you know? One moment the news is on, and it’s such very bad news from so many quarters (1). And then you’re shopping for new shoes (2). Both of these things are honest and true things about living in the world (3).

I was reading something the other day (you might’ve seen it; it was passed around facebook) arguing against the current conception of empathy, that it’s too easily swayed by individuals in crisis and not enough by long-term goals. And it reminded me of an episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation, where Riker gets turned into a god, and loses his capacity for empathy. Like most things, it’s a negotiation.

 

What does collaboration make possible in your work?

JG: Someone else! I get tired of myself and my way of thinking, and it’s great to get out of that house, go visiting. It’s why we have dinner parties? Something like that. A new context allows for new thinking.

KMD: Absolutely! Collaboration invites a degree of spontaneity into my practice that is just about impossible when I’m writing alone.  I tend to be a control freak, a compulsive planner.  But when you’re writing a book with John, you really never know what he’s going to do.  Which is a good thing.  Well, most of the time.

 

Read the whole interview here

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Tony Trigilio interviewed on Best American Poetry Blog

 

"Eleven Questions for Eleven Poets" Part 1 of the Best American Poetry blog interview! 



Alan Michael Parker interviewed Tony Trigilio
 and 10 other poets (Elizabeth Colen, Carolina Ebeid, Dana Levin, Max Ritvo, David Rivard, Chris Santiago, Lee Sharkey, Clint Smith, Megan Snyder-Camp, and Monica Youn). Everyone talks about their new books coming out this fall.
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Photos on flickr