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A whole lot of good news from Kristina Marie Darling

This is a whole lot of trending for Kristina Marie Darling. She is this weeks blogger at the Best American Poetry website and we’ll be posting her articles all week long. Here is the first:

 

February 02, 2015

 

Formal Innovation & Textual Rupture: A Conversation Between Kristina Marie Darling & Tony Trigilio [by Kristina Marie Darling]

 

Kristina Marie Darling:  Your new book, The Complete Dark Shadows (of My Childhood), Book 1, offers readers an extended engagement with 1960s mass culture, exploring the myriad ways that television and radio shape the individual consciousness.  This idea that culture determines what is possible within thought, and within the human mind, is gracefully enacted in the content of the poems, which appear as pristine couplets.  I'm intrigued, though, by moments when the form is broken, and the poems deviate from the pattern that has been established.  As the writer, how do you know when a form should be broken?  What does breaking form make possible within the content of your work?

 

Tony Trigilio:  Thanks so much for your detailed reading of the book.  My hope is that, as you mentioned, readers can identify with the ways mass media and individual consciousness shape each other in the book.  As I get deeper into Vol. 2 of the Dark Shadows project (about half-finished with the second volume now), I gain a deeper appreciation of mass media's roots in the verb "to mediate."  I realize the connection is obvious: but it's one thing to experience media/mediation intellectually, and an entirely different thing to experience it psychically and viscerally.  Like all of us, the development of my own psyche was mediated by electronic communication—for me, it was television and radio, and for folks growing up now, it's digital media.  It just so happens that the mediating force for me was a kitschy vampire and all the nightmares he caused me (though I was way too young to understand he was kitschy).  As scary as the continual nightmares were, they did introduce me to the power of dream and to the idea that dream-reality is as vital and real as waking-reality. 

 

Read the whole interview here: http://blog.bestamericanpoetry.com/the_best_american_poetry/2015/02/formal-innovation-textual-rupture-a-conversation-between-kristina-marie-darling-tony-trigilio-by-kri.html

 

 

A review and interview about Scorched Altar in Up the Staircase Quarterly.

 

Review:  http://www.upthestaircase.org/scorched-altar.html

 

Interview:  http://www.upthestaircase.org/interview-with-kristina-marie-darling.html

 

 

And finally here is new interview at Rob McClennan's Blog: 

 

http://www.robmclennan.blogspot.ca/2015/02/12-or-20-second-series-questions-with.html

 

 

Hurray! 

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As Visuality by Anne Gorrick Now Available!

In Anne Gorrick’s richly-faceted collection A’s Visuality, found texts are held up to the light and transformed into energies that can’t be contained by convention: “Origin and then form conforms to our interest.” This is the work of a highly-engaged intelligence, and Gorrick has made her own system by moving through the world with the given that this, too, is poetry. Here, it is color— not darkness— that surrounds us. What a beautiful place she has made.

—Carolyn Guinzio


In her fourth book, Anne Gorrick explores words related to painting: phrases from art criticism and the names of paint colors. In the first section, FOLIOs, we see an unusual transformation: Writing about painting turns into writing about people (which suggests that writing about people could turn into writing about painting). In the second section, Chromatic Sweep, we enter a realm of pure abstraction, the names of colors. Colors. Gorrick, also a visual artist, shows us how much can be done with the name of a color, how many words can grow from that single seed, how many images, how many statements, how many narratives. Does every color imply all the rest, a world of colors? They do here, in “R&F Reds” and other poems:

Red truth. It calls. It satisfies.

When a red situation looks like putty

When she is thin as a blue color and exits

These violent forms of announcement

a pink greenhouse as if you were angry

—Michael Ruby


Some poems are written slant. They surfaced because their poets didn’t have an idea they imposed on the poem to develop. They surfaced because the poets respected the raw material — words — enough to get out of the way to let the words speak for themselves. When the approach works, language becomes poetry by, in part, transcending the limits of the poets’ conscious imaginations. Such has resulted from Anne Gorrick’s A’s Visuality which presents a section of poems translated from prior positionings as visual art and a second section of poems taking off from the found language of a website’s description of paint colors. The first section, Folios, is rife with surfaced wisdom: “a map / as small as / astronauts” where guidance (map) is not the astronaut’s limits (knowledge) but the astronauts’ task (and desire) to explore or expand the limits of what’s known. In the second section Chromatic Sweep, never has color become so palpable (at times even edible or radioactive): “when black and white mix, there is a lower sound” or “red play back our own choking.” Gorrick trusted the words (“No editorial / preoccupied with”) and their reciprocation are lush poems that thoughtfully invite.

—Eileen Tabios

Anne Gorrick is the author of: I-Formation (Book 2) (Shearsman Books, Bristol, UK,2012), I-Formation (Book 1) (Shearsman, 2010), and Kyotologic (Shearsman, 2008). She has also co-edited (with Sam Truitt) In|Filtration: An Anthology of Innovative Poetry from the Hudson River Valley (Station Hill Press, Barrytown, NY, forthcoming in 2015). She has collaborated with artist Cynthia Winika to produce a limited edition artists’ book called “Swans, the ice,” she said with grants through the Women’s Studio Workshop in Rosendale, NY, and the New York Foundation for the Arts. She has also collaborated on large textual and/or visual projects with John Bloomberg-Rissman and Scott Helmes. She curates the reading series, Cadmium Text ( www.cadmiumtextseries.blogspot.com ) and co-curates (with Lynn Behrendt), the electronic journal Peep/Show at  www.peepshowpoetry.blogspot.com Her visual art can be seen at: www.theropedanceraccompaniesherself.blogspot.com

Anne Gorrick lives in West Park, New York.


Book Information:

· Paperback: 120 pages

· Binding: Perfect-Bound

· Publisher: BlazeVOX [books] 

· ISBN: 978-1-60964-182-5

FULL COLOR 

$28

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A’s Visuality by Anne Gorrick Book Preview

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Kristina Marie Darling's True North on today's Verse Daily

®

Today's poem is by Kristina Marie Darling

True North 
        

From the start you made me promise not to ask
questions about your first wife. You'd leave for
weeks and wouldn't tell me why.

When you finally came home, dinner always
began the same way. I'd catch a glimpse of 
something in the window while warming soup or 
vegetables. Then I looked out into the yard and 
saw her face. Sometimes she stood at the door, 
straightening her dress, about to knock. Most of 
the time she was out of breath, as though she'd 
walked a long way in the cold.
        No matter what you told me, I was afraid 
to open the door. She carried no purse, and no 
luggage, because everything she needed was
already here.


 


Copyright © 2015 Kristina Marie Darling All rights reserved
from The Arctic Circle 
BlazeVOX [books] 
Reprinted by Verse Daily® with permission

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Review of Eileen R. Tabios’ Footnotes to Algebra: Uncollected Poems 1995-2009 By Thomas Fink

Review of Eileen R. Tabios’ Footnotes to Algebra: Uncollected Poems 1995-2009

By Thomas Fink

Footnotes to Algebra by Eileen R. Tabios
Every poem and every collection of an author can be seen as a Footnote to Algebra, gesturing toward the elusive algebraic equation that could somehow represent the totality of a poet’s oeuvre. However, Eileen R. Tabios has a more intricate explanation in her blog, The Blind Chatelaine’s Keys, on Aug. 14, 2009 as she discusses Footnotes to Algebra: Uncollected Poems 1995-2009 (Kenmore, NY: BlazeVOX Books, 2009):

To collect a bunch of uncollected poems is, in a manner of speaking, another test of whether a poet has, as a saying might say, done it right. Does a collection hold together under the random manner in which it was formed? I always suspected that if Poetry is inherently a matter of interconnections (what we Pinoys also call pakikiramdam and what I lately have been calling algebraic as a result of three months of tutoring a 13-year-old boy in four years worth of math), such a book can hold together—also recall Gertrude Stein’s observation (I paraphrase) about how a word arbitrarily placed next to another word will rub together for some unexpected frisson if not generate some meaning. Many poets have written under such an inspiration—it’s not that ambitious, I thought, to create a book on that basis, too.

What the poet does not tell us is that there are section-headings, and these signposts not only echo concerns in Tabios’ earlier work but create—as Charles Bernstein characterized his 2001 book, With Strings—a “modular structure,” in which “a string of interchanging parts” inform “the book as a whole”: “Political, social, ethical, and textual investigations intermingle, presenting a linguistic echo chamber in which themes, moods, and perceptions are permuted, modulated, reverberated, and further extended” (131). While the first section, “New Poems,” which I take to mean poems that have not appeared in magazines, is an arbitrary ordering device, the next two sections, “Triptych for Philip” [Lamantia] and “Chant for Kari” [Edwards], are elegies for poet-friends, and other parts involve postcolonial (or in Tabios’ formulation, transcolonial) thinking (“A Filipino Accent”), poetry involving wine (“Wine Country Honeymoon”), poetry taking its beginning intention from visual art (“Ekphrasis”), and a lyrical series inspired by the work of Jose Garcia Villa (“Girl, Singing”). Yes, “poetry” may be “inherently a matter of interconnections,” but the principle of “a word arbitrarily place next to another” is not going to guarantee the collection of generative interconnections; the poet needs to have written the poems carefully and then to have thought vigorously enough to establish effective groupings. And she did.

Read the whole review here 

Check out Footnotes to Algebra Here 

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Evening Train by Tom Clark Reviewed in Elliptical Movements by Billy Mills

 

Evening Train by Tom Clark: A Review

Evening Train, by Tom Clark, BlazeVOX Books, 2014, ISBN: 978-1-60964-187-0, $16.00

The first thing to say about Tom Clark is that he is an American poet; this may seem too obvious to need stating, but it is fundamental to his art. The language, social norms and history of the United States are woven into the very fabric of his verse. This is made explicit in the first poem in Evening Train, ‘Moving House’, where the process of house removal is folded into the myth of Manifest Destiny, a people

…always moving out

ahead of the next wave yet not

riding the last wave to the crest

Clark writes poems that encompass memory (a central preoccupation), the natural world and our role in it, ageing and death, the interface between technology and social control: but all these matters are examined in a landscape that is specifically American and generally urban. Many of the poems set in the now reflect the geography of the city of Berkeley, where Clark has lived for many years. For instance, the almost surreal, apocalyptic poem ‘skyfalling’ is firmly anchored to a specific street junction in a precise social milieu:

Ninth and Bancroft, West Berkeley

insecure householder half dressed

emerges from behind barred gate

looks up into dark sky

one arm bent overhead as if to shield, crouching –

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