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The Woman with a Million Hearts by Loren Kleinman Now Available!

Loren Kleinman brings a poet's sensibility to her captivating memoir that is at once serious and sly, self-deprecating and a powerful declaration of self. Her memoir is less about memory than it is a fine-tuned, near magical consideration of the small details that ultimately make manifest the large passions of her life. Her edgy meditations are a bit like a delicately rendered Lost and Found for the great grab bag of human experience--instantly relatable, brash, intimate and true.

—Rita Gabis, author of A Guest At The Shooters' Banquet

Nothing is sexier than a woman who has learned to love and respect herself, and that’s why The Woman With a Million Hearts is such a treasure. Kleinman’s powerful journey, told in vignettes, is beautiful and vulnerable and bold and exciting. She’s like the friend you haven’t heard from in a while, and when she calls you immediately ditch your I hate my body/boyfriend/husband/job/life friends and meet her, because she’s not just fun to be with, she’s wise! She’s been through a lot; she’s endured a lot. So, you ask her, how does the self-love thing happen? And she answers No one matters as much as they think they do, not under the stars, under the heavy Milky Way... and you know what, she’s absolutely right! This book belongs on your night table, to be read and re-read.

—Robin Stratton, Boston Literary Magazine

Loren Kleinman’s The Woman with a Million Hearts is a lyrical masterpiece. In this beautiful memoir, Kleinman weaves stories of heartache, pain, healing, and hope into a breathtaking journey told with an honesty that will leave you gasping for air.

—Amye Archer, Fat Girl, Skinny

Loren Kleinman's memoir, The Woman with a Million Hearts, blurs the line between memoir and poetry as she explores illness, loss, and love in a slim book that makes you understand how to love flawed humanity with tender compassion.

—Karol Nielsen, author of the memoir, Black Elephants, and the poetry chapbook, This Woman I Thought I'd Be

Loren Kleinman is not just an organic expressionist-writer; she's also comparative to poetic musicians like Joni Mitchell and Bonnie Raitt. A unique and lively young voice filled with splendor!

—Kola Boof, The Sexy Part of the Bible

A daring act of memory in verse that dances in the space between poetry and prose, The Woman with a Million Hearts offers readers an equal number of delights.

—Lisa L. Kirchner, Hello American Lady Creature: What I Learned as a Woman in Qatar


Add one more heart to Loren Kleinman’s The Woman With A Million Hearts. She grabbed mine from the first page and didn’t release me until the last. Ms. Kleinman has written a luscious memoir—rich with expansive language; yet her words adhere to a rigorous economy which distills the essence of her experience to perfection. It is always a testament to a writer when the reader is inspired to go inward and think deeply. Loren Kleinman demands that of the reader, and we are better for it —more forgiving and more loving.

—Marcia Butler, author of the forthcoming memoir, The Skin Above My Knee

A generous and honest work of memoir that reads like poetry, Loren Kleinman's book will resonate with anyone who's ever wondered, 'How can I be saved?

—Susan Breen, author of the Maggie Dove mystery series

A new genre, perhaps more poetry than memoir, Loren Kleinman's A WOMAN WITH A MILLION HEARTS is a story of an inner life beautifully rendered. The life events that elicit these short pieces belong to the body rather than the mind, and fade in and out, sometimes hinting, sometimes revealing, as if they are happening inside out. Intimate,
yet secretive. Compelling.

—Lynda Schor, author of SEXUAL HARASSMENT RULES, and other books

Loren Kleinman’s poetry has appeared in journals such ADANNA, Drunken Boat, The Moth, Domestic Cherry, Blue Lake Review, Columbia Journal, LEVURE LITTÉRAIRE, Stony Thursday (Arts Council Ireland), Nimrod, Wilderness House Literary Review, Narrative Northeast, Writer’s Bloc, Journal of New Jersey Poets, Paterson Literary Review (PLR), Resurgence (UK), HerCircleEzine and Aesthetica Annual. Her interviews appeared in IndieReader, USA Today, and The Huffington Post. She’s also published essays in Cosmopolitan, Good Housekeeping and Seventeen Magazine. She is the author of Flamenco Sketches and Indie Authors Naked, which was an Amazon Top 100 bestseller in Journalism in the UK and USA. Kleinman’s The Dark Cave Between My Ribs was named one the best poetry books of 2014 by Entropy Magazine. Her other poetry collections include Breakable Things and the prose collection, Stay With Me Awhile. She is working on a novel, This Way to Forever. She is a faculty member at New York Writer’s Workshop and a full-time freelance writer and social media strategist. The Woman with a Million Hearts is her first memoir. Loren’s website is: lorenkleinman.com and lorenwrites.com.


Book Information:

· Paperback: 120 pages

· Binding: Perfect-Bound

· Publisher: BlazeVOX [books] 

· ISBN: 978-1-60964-249-5

$16

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

The Woman With a Million Hearts by Loren Kleinman Book Preview

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Un/Wired by Stephen Bett Now Available!

In this, his 18th book of poetry, internationally acclaimed Canadian poet Stephen Bett is back to working the sassy, edgy margins of social satire. Divided into four sections, this book opens with humor; turns to soft-edge and then to hard-edge, wicked, hilarious satire of our vapid monoculture; and concludes with a section of poems bringing in the angst of it all.


PRAISE FOR STEPHEN BETT’S MOST RECENT BLAZEVOX BOOK,
Those Godawful Streets of Man: A Book of Raw Wire in the City:

“I love what Stephen Bett is doing with language in his latest opus…

Bett’s his own man here. He’s absorbed the lessons of the Objectivists, Beats, Black Mountain, New York and San Francisco schools; the Canadian Tish poets’ experiments with vernacular phonological phrasing in open form; the studious avoidance of the ‘burnished urn’ Modernist reliance on myth, metaphor, and intellectual conceits, dense allusion, tight boxed containers.

Not that Bett’s poems aren’t marvelously allusive; the bric-à-brac of pop culture is all here: movies, cell phones, the Web, selfies, Tweets and all manner of squawks from the Interface. But there is nothing overtly confessional and the stitches and strophes are utterly comfortable and companionable…

This is minimalism for readers who like their poems fat: rich, but sans impasto or ornament. A book of raw wire in the city: edgy, tense, sharp, angular, dangerous… .

At the heart of the book…is the story of a dissolving relationship, the man too earnest and accepting; the woman raging and fading into madness. But nothing is cloying or mawkish or sentimental, or even confessional; instead we shift easily from a sort of Special Victims Unit episode of macro family skeleton news to deeply personal, eviscerating sorrow―with grace and elan.

Musically, rhythmically, the poet is adroit, fluid, as graceful as Sonny Rollins on a good day. You can feel those tight turns, drops, and ascents as you might on a carnival ride; Bett doesn’t waste a word, but pastes you to the back of your vernacular cage. You are in for the ride.

Line for line, strophe for strophe, image for image, Stephen Bett’s latest delivers the news, along with the tart taste of jazz and blues.”

—Richard Stevenson, Pacific Rim Review of Books

Those Godawful Streets of Man takes an unapologetic, unflinching look into the back alleys and poorly lit areas of the human condition….You will find a voice that is braver than many, and a view of the world that is beautiful in its starkness.”

—Stuart Gill, Front Porch Journal

For reviews of all his books, and for recent interviews, visit stephenbett.com

Stephen Bett is a widely and internationally published Canadian poet. His earlier work is known for its sassy, edgy, hip… caustic wit―indeed, for the askance look of the serious satirist… skewering what he calls the ‘vapid monoculture’ of our times. His more recent books have been called an incredible accomplishment for their authentic minimalist subtlety. Many are tightly sequenced book-length ‘serial’ poems, which allow for a rich echoing of cadence and image, building a wonderfully subtle, nuanced music. Bett follows in the avant tradition of Don Allen’s New American Poets. Hence the mandate for Simon Fraser University’s “Contemporary Literature Collection” to purchase and archive his “personal papers” for scholarly use. He is recently retired after a 31-year teaching career largely at Langara College in Vancouver, and now lives with his wife Katie in Victoria, BC.


Book Information:

· Paperback: 124 pages

· Binding: Perfect-Bound

· Publisher: BlazeVOX [books] 

· ISBN: 978-1-60964-253-2

 $16
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Un/Wired by Stephen Bett Book Preview

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Hybrid Hierophanies by Clayton Eshleman Now Available!

 from HYBRID HIEROPHANIES:

 

 

Theseus, a tiny male spider, enters a tri-level construction:
look down through the poem, you can see the labyrinth.
Look down through the labyrinth, you can see the spider-centered web.

                                                             Coatlicue
              Sub-incision                Bud Powell
                              César Vallejo
                                          The bird-headed shaman

These nouns are also nodes in a constellation called
Clayton’s Tjurunga. The struts are threads
in a web. There is life blood flowing through
these threads. Coatlicue flows into Bud Powell,
César Vallejo into sub-incision.

                         The bird-headed shaman
is slanted under a disemboweled bison.
His erection tells me he is in flight. He drops
his bird-headed stick as he penetrates
     bison paradise.

The red sandstone hand lamp
abandoned below this scene
is engraved with vulvate chevrons—did it once flame
     from a primal sub-incision?

This is the oldest part of this tjurunga, its grip.

 

 

 

 

Clayton Eshleman’s most recently-published books are Clayton Eshleman / The Essential Poetry 1960-2015 (Black Widow Press) and A Sulfur Anthology (Wesleyan University Press). Hybrid Hierophanies will be included in Penetralia to be published by Black Widow Press in 2017.  Eshleman’s website is: www.claytoneshleman.com. Adrienne Rich has stated: “As a poet and translator, Clayton Eshleman has gone more deeply into his art, its processes and demands, than any modern American poet since Robert Duncan and Muriel Rukeyser.” And Robert Kelly has written: “Nobody is like him in his struggle. At times he makes the wildness of most poetry seem merely effete. I know of no poet who has fed so richly from the thingliness of the world beneath his feet, none who so resists the glamour of beliefs. He is a shaman without a single superstition.”

 

 

 

Book Information:

 

· Paperback: 28 pages

· Binding: Perfect-Bound

· Publisher: BlazeVOX [books] 

· ISBN: 978-1-60964-252-5

 

$12 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Hybrid Hierophanies by Clayton Eshleman Book Preview

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Gargantua by Jennie Cole Now Available!

Rabelais tells how Pantagruel plucked frozen words from the air, which ‘when we had somewhat warm’d them between our Hands, they melted like Snow, and we really heard them’. Jennie Cole thaws out Rabelais’s gargantuan language, takes his ‘odd, quaint, merry and fat words’ and throws them back into the air. In poems whose farce is always proximate to tragedy, she reworks Gargantua’s impresa, itself a satire of Plato’s Symposium, of the lovers as conjoined twins who face not the world but each other. Her text twins with Rabelais’, joining itself in eros and appetite to the original in a play of delight. At the same time, it turns outward to tear that body apart ‘and dance in its square’. These are poems to gnaw on and play with, ‘At the tarots. At the torture. At the click.’

—Andrea Brady, author of Wildfire: A Verse Essay on Obscurity 
and Illumination (Krupskaya, 2010)


GARGANTUA is a poem to read and put aside to read again. an encounter with overlapping narratives at once broken and recurring. exuberant use of language enhances the stride of disrupted syntax with turns of humour, worry, mistake. addresses are to the second person and the first, incomplete or get mislaid, encourage amusement and breath-catch. humanity trapped in a cyber-vice, embedded in rich and confident qualm. this is a rare new book.

—Allen Fisher, author of PLACE (Reality Street, 2005)


Rabelais loved language and its potentialities – and so, too, clearly does Jennie Cole in this exuberant and confident sequence. No ‘carefully ordered work of reference’, GARGANTUA is rather a series of carefully choreographed car crashes, through which various registers are subjected to deformation and, as with Rabelais’s original work, contemporary learning rubs shoulders (and, possibly, more) with the body and its vital and abject fluids. An impressive achievement.

—Robert Hampson, author of Seaport (Shearsman, 2008)

Jennie Cole is a poet and artist who lives and works in London, making poems, books, videos and things-in-between. Her work has recently appeared at/in things like Otoliths, Gray Area, POLYply, E.ratio, MCBA Book Arts Biennial, Exploding Cinema, ArtLacuna Film Festival, Caesura Gallery, Literary Kitchen Festival, Magic Lantern Cinema, Whitebox Art Center, and Amid the Ruins. Jennie is currently undertaking a practice-based doctorate with the Poetics Research Centre at RHUL.


Book Information:

· Paperback: 42 pages

· Binding: Perfect-Bound

· Publisher: BlazeVOX [books] 

· ISBN: 978-1-60964-206-8

$12

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Gargantua by Jennie Cole Book Preview

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Ubermutter's Death Dance by Laura Hinton Now Available!

Übermütter's Death Dance is a mixed-genre poetry series recounting a mother's experience of an adult child's death. Beginning with reportorial poet's prose, the book dissolves into a series of lyric pieces that incorporate song fragments and scripted movement into written text. Memoir-like surreal prose tales lace together multiple modalities of poetry into a script that creates and re-creates the "Übermütter"—a pluralized figure—into repeating but evolving reconstructions of grieving "selves." These are performance "selves" that appear and reappear, as reflected in the disembodied sightings that also distill this book's deeper exploration of matter through 3-D figuration. Interweaving multicultural historical-spiritual texts with literary and psychological accounts of death and dying, this hybrid poetry work provides space for words that mirror the grieving body, for a body that mirrors back the spatially moving text.

"There is no way to make sense of a senseless death, but in Übermütter's Death Dance, Laura Hinton engages the senses to stay alive and to find, if not meaning, then some sort of vital force in the midst of tragedy. Hinton’s heterogeneous yet unified collection combines the rhetoric of documentation and daily life with the lyricism of dreams, visions and ritual. The result is profound, moving and mercurial."

—Joanna Fuhrman, author of The Year of Yellow Butterflies


"How do we survive grief—let alone write it? Shattered by the inexplicable death of her only child at 32, Laura Hinton miraculously gives us this lacerating work of witness. “am I still a mother?” she asks, refusing any answer. Her voice is at once desperate and wise, knowing that no one wants to live in these pages: “I / breathe on you / my Death / contagion,” she quips—“I am un-home / d.” And because in grief “time does not exist,” sequence reverses, halts, disappears: “no future tense in morning time,” “there is no ‘after.’” In the shifting landscapes and timescapes of Hinton’s work, memory and dream, lived and imagined experience, coalesce in the dissociation anyone who has mourned will recognize. I feel privileged to read—to be—in these words."

—Elisabeth Frost, author of The Feminist Avant-Garde in American Poetry


"Laura Hinton’s heartbreakingly beautiful elegy to her son Paul, Übermütter's Death Dance, is a thrilling choreography of lyric, memoir, dance, spirituality and theory. In this book, Hinton assembles a profound reflection about motherhood, death and love. Indeed, the reader dances throughout this mother’s life and death dance, leaping and soaring from one gorgeously written section to the next."

—Karen Brennan, author of little dark

Laura Hinton is a multi-media poet, scholar, editor and literary critic based in New York City. Her scholarly books include The Perverse Gaze of Sympathy: Sadomasochistic Sentiments from Clarissa to Rescue 911 (SUNY Press), and two edited collections on women's poetics: Jayne Cortez, Adrienne Rich, and the Feminist Superhero: Voice, Vision, Politics, and Performance in U.S. Contemporary Women's Poetics (Lexington Books) and We Who Love to Be Astonished: Experimental Women’s Writing and Performance Poetics (co-editor with Cynthia Hogue, University of Alabama Press). She has published a poetry book, Sisyphus My Love (To Record a Dream in a Bathtub) (BlazeVox Books), and many independent hybrid poetry pieces including photography and/or video in journals like Yew, Madhatter Review, Feminist Studies, and Poetryseen. She publishes critical essays on literature and film in journals like Textual Practice and Jacket 2, and has also published creative non-fiction essays, most recently in The Intima. She is the editor of a performance chapbook series under the imprint of Mermaid Tenement Press, and has kept a literary blog of essays on hybrid poetics since 2009, entitled, Chant de la Sirene. Laura Hinton is a Professor of English at the City College of New York (CUNY), where she teaches women's literature, contemporary poetics, visual studies and feminist theory. Her website is located at www.laurahinton-singingsirens.com.

Book Information:

· Paperback: 124 pages

· Binding: Perfect-Bound

· Publisher: BlazeVOX [books] 

· ISBN: 978-1-60964-241-9

$16


Also see: Sisyphus My Love by Laura Hinton

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Übermütter's Death Dance by Laura Hinton Book Preview

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