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A Lyrebird, Selected Poems of Michael Farrell by Michael Farrell; Editor Jared Schickling Now Available!

Revelation and habit conspire in this selection of Michael Farrell’s poetry, whose shambling virtuosity brings to mind the lost art of scat singing. From his earliest poems, Farrell’s skittish lines echo the studied laissez-faire of the New York School, but they also make it new, with a startling range of tone and diction broadcast—and exquisitely garbled—from somewhere down under. Yet perhaps the most astonishing quality of Farrell’s poetry is the way it summons that rarest of affinities—a correspondence with the movement of dance. For reading Farrell’s poems can feel like one is shadowing a step, a combination, by Gene Kelly—or Savion Glover, looping and breaking across a field of trifles and sorrows.

—Daniel Tiffany


Enter A Lyrebird and you open onto a polyphony of slang and nuance. Expect a humorous disorientation and deep travel through undersides of all that can be said and borrowed. Just in time, since mono-culture cannot know itself, Michael Farrell’s deft bravery transmutes English and gives us journeys out.

—Sarah Riggs

 
 
 
 

Michael Farrell grew up in Bombala, New South Wales. He lives in Melbourne. He has edited features for US journals Slope, GutCult and ecopoetics. He visited the US in 2004, 2015 and 2016, and has performed in Buffalo, Seattle, Berkeley, and San Francisco. Books unrepresented in this selection are BREAK ME OUCH (a comics poetry book, 3 Deep), and Long Dull Poem (SOd). His scholarly book, revised from his PhD, is Writing Australian Unsettlement: Modes of Poetic Invention 1796-1945 (Palgrave Macmillan). Michael also edited, with Jill Jones, Out of the Box: Contemporary Australian Gay and Lesbian Poets (Puncher and Wattmann, 2009), and edits the magazine Flash Cove (flashcovemag@gmail.com), with designer Wendy Cooper. He writes songs with Jimmy Hawk, and co-wrote the Dick Diver single “Waste the Alphabet.”

His poems have been included in the Turnrow Anthology of Australian Poetry (Turnrow) and Active Aesthetics: Contemporary Australian Poetry (Tuumba/Giramondo), as well as the following North American journals, some now defunct: Boston Review; Denver Quarterly; Verse; Pool; Lana Turner; can we have our ball back; Moria; Poetry; Shampoo; smalltown; Coconut; ex-ex-lit; Mirage#4/Period(ical); Yellow Field; blue and yellow dog; La Petite Zine; eccolinguistics; LIT; The Literary Review; Quarterly West; Slope; Tooth; Volt; Aught; Boog City; Dispatch Detroit; ducky; Fence; GutCult; Poethia; petticoat relaxer; sendecki.com; sidereality and others; thanks to their editors.


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Jared Schickling is the author of several BlazeVOX books, including the trilogy Two Books on the Gas: Above the Shale and Achieved by Kissing + ATBOALGFPOPASASBIFL: Irritations, Excrement and Wipes + The Pink (2015-13) and Province of Numb Errs (2016), as well as The Paranoid Reader: Essays, 2006-2012 (Furniture Press, 2014) and the chapbook Prospectus for a Stage (LRL Textile Series, 2013). He lives in Western New York and edits Delete Press and The Mute Canary, publishers of poetry.

Book Information:

· Paperback: 162 pages

· Binding: Perfect-Bound

· Publisher: BlazeVOX [books] 

· ISBN: 978-1-60964-280-8

$18

 
 
 

A Lyrebird- Selected Poems of Michael Farrell Book Preview

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The MERCURY POEM by Jared Schickling Now Available!

 THE MERCURY POEM sifts through the aftermath of nuclear meltdown and lets the senses piece us together. A puzzle: in this our time of ever-expanding exclusion zones, how to take cover / take care inside foregone conclusion? What is not forgone? What is poetry inside such disaster? Ear to the ground, eye on the facts, and with heart and subtle humor, Jared Schickling offers a volatile music where “flammable animals cavort / bioplastic / in the bioplast” and the fish choir takes over. Here is poetry that pulses, in search of. Read up.

—Ryan Eckes


Writing from the liver of what he’d call a National Sacrifice Zone, Schickling’s oozy syntax mixes tire fires and shrimp songs, transboundary waste dumping and hungry babies. And against easy, blissed-out landscape poetry, he gives us ecologies as they are: wondrous saturations of life and matter disturbed by floods of mutagenic pollutants in poems like damaged double-helixes that make a jagged sense read forward or backward. This collection is, by turns, playful and ethically rigorous, performing playful flips in language but also never forgetting we live in a world that will remain marked for millennia by acts of corporate and governmental malfeasance. The poems remind us that environmental catastrophe and quotidian life touch each other in intimate, ongoing ways.

—Joe Hall


With THE MERCURY POEM, Jared Schickling brings us an oddly reversible apocalypse—the story of individuals grappling with their own bleak place in history. “A tsunami ruining the beach / during an election season,” “the exclusion zone is breeding,” and as an elegy to television, the poet finds normalcy in the unlivable.

—Jonathan Penton

Jared Schickling is the author of several BlazeVOX books, including the trilogy The Pink + ATBOALGFPOPASASBIFL: Irritations, Excrement and Wipes + Two Books on the Gas: Above the Shale and Achieved by Kissing (2013-15) and Province of Numb Errs (2016), as well as The Paranoid Reader: Essays, 2006-2012 (Furniture Press, 2014); the chapbooks Prospectus for a Stage (LRL Textile Series, 2013) and A Packet of Food (Omnia Vanitas Review, 2013); two Trump Locofo chaps, Donald Trump and the Pocket Oracle and Donald Trump in North Korea (Moria, 2017); and he edited A Lyrebird: Selected Poems of Michael Farrell (BlazeVOX, 2017). He lives in Western New York and edits Delete Press and The Mute Canary, publishers of poetry.

Book Information:

· Paperback: 72 pages

· Binding: Perfect-Bound

· Publisher: BlazeVOX [books] 

· ISBN: 978-1-60964-300-3

$16

 
 
 
 
 

The MERCURY POEM by Jared Schickling Book Preview 

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Province of Numb Errs by Jared Schickling

 Poetry is not another way of telling you what to think. Sure, be a poet, and humble(d). Jared Schickling’s Province of Numb Errs is a relief: out of monotime (“This time has no here its All here u / go”); avoiding collisions with prevalent discourse. If you’re interested in the writing human, be interested in this. 


—Michael Farrell

Camel, ass, lion, pig, donkey, horse, ox, fawn, duckling, osprey, sea snail, snake; infirmary, school, factory farm; bar, travel, underwear, childbirth, solar observatory, sex acts, and “the morning corpse of water”: maybe you can tell from this list of images in this book what Jared Shickling’s concerns are. “Natures impatience / homage de / con struck / shun / remains” enacts the breakdown of a world that we are destroying, so at times her syntax and spelling are altered, even to the point of using single letters. “Until I touch you and am unclean myself’’ suggests the ways we separate ourselves, male from female, human animal from other animals. “He has a blemish // he will profane not my sanctuaries.” Religion and archaisms continue to influence us in unpardonable ways. Critiques of factory farms run through the book, the most upsetting of which is a poem in which a worker confesses the horrors of tortures inflicted upon pigs. This is poetry infused with morality; its structure and its subjects are inseparable, because Shickling clearly feels the waste and misuse of the world so deeply. “Emotions mixed like primary colors.” We need such books.

—Ruth Lepson

Jared Schickling’s Province of Numb Errs is a quirky, sincere and often funny homage to the long arms of his Catholic upbringing. Less dour than Stephen Daedalus and the other cohorts of Joyce’s imagination, the narrators in these poems gleefully yoke together Biblical clichés and homespun homilies, xenophobic injunctions and commonsense imperatives, and, per rhetoric, the highfalutin’ and colloquial. The overall effect: wild swings between apocalyptic musings and unleashed hilarity. Unpacking the pejorative “provincial” lurking behind the more neutral “province,” Schickling delineates the family ties between prejudice and place. Moreover, his forays into flora and fauna husbandry in the second half of the book leave us with this unsettling realization: we were always estranged from any, from every, place.

—Tyrone Williams

Jared Schickling is the author of the BlazeVOX trilogy Two Books on the Gas: Above the Shale and Achieved by Kissing (2014) + ATBOALGFPOPASASBIFL (2013) + The Pink (2012), as well as The Paranoid Reader: Essays, 2006-2012 (Furniture Press, 2014). He edits Delete Press and lives in Western New York.

Book Information:

· Paperback: 78 pages

· Binding: Perfect-Bound

· Publisher: BlazeVOX [books] 

· ISBN: 9781609642457

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Province of Numberrs by Jared Schickling Book Preview

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Two Books on the Gas by Jared Schickling Now Available!

Two Books on the Gas splits us in two: Above the Shale is ‘Diving into the Wreck’ for a credible earth, both aboveground and below. The topics are fracking and love and political violence and ashes in known states of fractured experience. The words, phrases, and ventured pages are so alive and differentiated you can sense your emplacement in the physical world. Achieved by Kissing is a demotic abecedarian, the exhalation of intense writing, an open human mirror of the attentive civic witness. Jared Schickling both kicks and tickles in this poetry that is both piece by piece and a whole art. Responsibility was never so gently insisted.

—Lisa Samuels


Schickling’s materiel-driven poetics mashes up a pre-ethicalized consciousness of the raw human reach for Life with the divination-pose of Fuel Speculation’s futurity e pluribus Unum. The “rational” to “irrational” spectrum of our present’s “present”, betrays an unspoken truth: the Republic of Fuel has, in fact, no sensate feel for time—at all.

In these Two Books on The Gas, Schickling engages us with a scintillating exploration of how the affective waste need not be merely contained and managed, but how it can be projected out—away towards a new Human Chronos of Possibility. This passionate, devoted tourney of recalc, brooks no compromises with either political brink pragmatists nor with apocalypticisms of any brand, threading instead a fully realized Eros of poetic illumination borne of the same materiality from which this Republic of Fuel is, for all to see, falling. People (and thus poetics) are rising.

—Rodrigo Toscano

Jared Schickling is the author of several BlazeVOX books, including ATBOALGFPOPASASBIFL (2013) and The Pink (2012), as well as the chapbook Prospectus for a Stage (LRL Textile Series, 2013) and The Paranoid Reader: Essays, 2006-2012 (Furniture Press, 2014). He co-edits Delete Press, eccolinguistics, and Reconfigurations: A Journal for Poetics and Poetry / Literature and Culture. He lives in Western New York.

Book Information:

· Paperback: 174 pages

· Binding: Perfect-Bound

· Publisher: BlazeVOX [books] 

· ISBN: 978-1-60964-196-2

$16

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Two Books on the Gas- Above the Shale and Achieved by Kissing by Jared Schickling Book Preview

 

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Bookslut: THE READER AS COLLABORATOR: A CONVERSATION BETWEEN JARED SCHICKLING AND KRISTINA MARIE DARLING

 

THE READER AS COLLABORATOR: A CONVERSATION BETWEEN JARED SCHICKLING AND KRISTINA MARIE DARLING

Kristina Marie Darling is the author of sixteen books, which include Melancholia (An Essay)Petrarchan, and a forthcoming hybrid genre collection calledFortress. Her awards include fellowships from Yaddo, the Helene Wurlitzer Foundation, and the Hawthornden Castle International Retreat for Writers, as well as grants from the Kittredge Fund and the Elizabeth George Foundation. She is currently working toward a Ph.D. in Poetics at S.U.N.Y.-Buffalo.

Jared Schickling is the author of several books, includingATBOALGFPOPASASBIFL: Irritations, Excrement & Wipes and The Pink, and the chapbook Prospectus for a Stage. A critical work, The Paranoid Reader: 2006-2012, is forthcoming. He is an editor at Delete Press, eccolinguistics, andReconfigurations: A Journal for Poetics and Poetry / Literature and Culture. He lives in Lockport, New York.

Darling: All too often, the reader comes to a poem and finds that all the work has been done for them. A linear narrative, clearly defined terms, and a lucid explanation of what things "mean" are already there on the page. What I enjoyed most about your new collection -- which consists of hybrid genre prose, footnotes, found text, and struck-through lines of verse -- is that the book's collage-like quality demands a more active role on the part of the reader. Rather than presenting the reader with a clear-cut explanation of things, you invite them to participate actively in the process of creating meaning from the text. In many ways, it is the reader who actualizes your poems. Do you envision your work as collaborative in nature? Does the collaborative element in your work extend beyond the reader, encompassing other literary and cultural texts as well?

Schickling: To start with, I should say how glad I am to be talking with you about your work. This is a very exacting question, and I promise to try and keep up...

Lately I have been thinking about "quantum entanglement." Basically (ha!), when the quantum elements of two subatomic particles, such as electrons, and it has also been observed in diamonds, become "entangled," then what you do to and observe in the one will absolutely predict what its entangled partner will subsequently exhibit: the inverse of that observation. This despite the unique existence each entangled particle may experience, and it can occur instantaneously -- faster than the speed of light, the Constant, which is a physical "impossibility" -- whereby observers conclude that quantum entanglement is not merely about some message being sent from one place to another. Instead, one can create or teleport the state of matter to elsewhere by purposefully manipulating the entangled counterpart here. Physicists speak of this as mere information transfer, feeding the dream of quantum computing, to bypass satellites. The phenomenon, though it sounds far out, was discovered by Einstein a century ago, who didn't like it and disbelieved his findings, calling it "spooky action at a distance" (ironically, the concept was the same desperate speculation Newton had given for gravity, what he couldn't explain, and which Einstein sought to debunk in his General Theory of Relativity). Edwin Schrödinger, who argued this aspect of quantum mechanics with Einstein in letters, wrote in an article: "I would not call it one but rather the characteristic trait of quantum mechanics, the one that enforces its entire departure from classical lines of thought." Quantum entanglement has been "easily" produced in laboratory and accidentally "harnessed" in manufacture for some time, while the instruments of entanglement in particles are photons -- light, essentially. The phenomenon was essential in the functioning of the first transistor-based computers and the creation of lasers. 



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